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September 1, 2020

Heroes – David Bowie – Drum Cover

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Today I have the pleasure to be sharing with you my latest video of the incredible drum cover of Heroes by David Bowie.

David Bowie has been one of the most incredible artists of the 20th century and this is my tribute to him!

If you are a fan of great grooves, you will not want to miss this!

You can watch the full video here below embedded directly from my You Tube channel. Hope you enjoy it!

I really enjoyed playing along to this incredible Rock classic by David Bowie.

If you want to know more about this wonderful song and album you can read here below directly from Wikipedia:

“Heroes” is the 12th studio album by English singer-songwriter David Bowie, released on 14 October 1977 by RCA Records. It was the second installment of his “Berlin Trilogy” recorded with collaborator Brian Eno and producer Tony Visconti, following Low (released earlier that year) and preceding Lodger (1979). Of the three albums, it was the only one wholly recorded in Berlin.

“Heroes” continued the ambient experiments of its predecessor, albeit with more pop elements and passionate performances, and featured contributions from King Crimson guitarist Robert Fripp. “Heroes” was the most well-received work of Bowie’s Berlin Trilogy by music critics on release, and was named Album of the Year by NME and Melody Maker. It was also a commercial success, peaking at number 3 on the UK Albums Chart. The title track remains one of Bowie’s best known and acclaimed songs.

The album has been reissued multiple times and was remastered in 2017 as part of the A New Career in a New Town (1977–1982) box set. Like Iggy Pop’s The Idiot (co-produced and co-written by Bowie), the “Heroes” album cover is an allusion to the painting “Roquairol” by Erich Heckel. An altered and obscured version of the album’s cover artwork later appeared as the artwork for Bowie’s 2013 album The Next Day.

Recorded at Hansa Tonstudio in what was then West Berlin, “Heroes” reflected the zeitgeist of the Cold War, symbolised by the divided city. Co-producer Tony Visconti considered it “one of my last great adventures in making albums.

The studio was about 500 yards [460 metres] from the Berlin Wall. Red Guards would look into our control-room window with powerful binoculars.” Earlier in 1977, Kraftwerk had name-checked Bowie on the title track of Trans-Europe Express, and he again paid tribute to his Krautrock influences: the title is a nod to the track “Hero” on the album Neu! ’75 by the German band Neu! – whose guitarist Michael Rother had originally been approached to play on the album – while “V-2 Schneider” is inspired by and named after Kraftwerk’s Florian Schneider.

Despite the German influences, the album was recorded with Bowie’s British and American collaborators, with no input from German musicians other than backing vocalist Antonia Maass. Masayoshi Sukita’s cover photo was inspired by German artist Erich Heckel’s Roquairol.

Bowie said that the quotation marks in the title “indicate a dimension of irony about the word ‘heroes’ or about the whole concept of heroism”. Brian Eno instigated Robert Fripp’s involvement. “I got a phone call when I was living in New York in July 1977,” the guitarist recalled. “It was Brian Eno. He said that he and David were recording in Berlin and passed me over. David said, ‘Would you be interested in playing some hairy rock ‘n’ roll guitar?’ I said, ‘Well, I haven’t really played for three years – but, if you’re prepared to take a risk, so will I.’ Shortly afterwards, a first-class ticket on Lufthansa arrived.” Upon arriving at the studio, and suffering from jet lag, Fripp recorded a guitar part for “Beauty and the Beast”: this first take was used in the song’s final mix.

Although “Heroes” continued Bowie’s work in electronic and ambient music styles and included a number of dark and atmospheric instrumentals such as “Sense of Doubt” and “Neuköln”, it was regarded as a highly passionate and positive artistic statement, particularly after the often melancholy Low.

The lyrics for “Joe the Lion”, written and recorded at the microphone “in less than an hour” according to Visconti, typified the improvisational nature of the recording. Eno employed his Oblique Strategies cards during the recording of the album. Stories suggest they were used during the recording of instrumentals such as “Sense of Doubt”.

I hope you enjoyed reading this article and watching my video of the drum cover of Heroes by David Bowie. If you did, please let me know in the comment section below and share it with a fellow drummer or musician who loves music and groove as much as we do!

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